gearhead

anne wrote this in the wee hours:

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chilly and overcast as it has been during the weeks of june, i’ve had no lapse in my desire to knit every day—and with nice wooly yarns at that. i am actually hard at work on sweaters for fall already, so i’m content that the temperatures stay right where they are.

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you might be in the same situation—some extra knitting time on your hands due to vacation or summer work hours and looking for a project to get you ahead of the game on fall knitting? but you still want it to be simple and fun, right?

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of course you do! and this one might be right up your alley—mostly stockinette on larger needles with fun cable details to keep you ticking those rounds off. that’s right—i said rounds; this one is also seamless, so when the knitting is done, it’s done. ya gotta love that.

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and here’s the best part—it’s not only easy to knit and seamless, it’s also shareable—tell me you’re not sold now. it looks adorable on lauren, doesn’t it?

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i pretty much designed this sweater specifically for our friend bill and the prototype was knit by the very talented anne C in BNWs stone soup DK (color pumice). prototype approved by bill, we got to work creating a production pattern and when it was done

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our friend carie was just getting ready to knit her husband a sweater and when he said he liked the design, she volunteered to test it out in our kent DK yarn (color mussel shell).
despite going through a big family move to another state, she whipped right through the pattern and wow, it worked up a treat, didn’t it??

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dave is very happy. really.
it’s hard to tell from the photos but the fabric is extremely light and airy—surprisingly so. guys like that.

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and stop. it.—barb also got in on the act and knit up this delicious cotton version with ecobutterfly organic pakucho worsted in the rustic avocado shade. unfortunately the weather this week did not permit us to get photos for today, but we will bring you some great ones next week.

the terrific thing about the cotton version is its versatility—soft, warm, and very easy to care for, it works well for beach and cabin. i blocked barb’s sweater by tossing it in the washer and then the dryer; it came out wonderfully fluffy and springy.

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the cable detailing along the seamlines and front placket is classy and simple to work; it provides a great textural element and some fun for the knitter, but it’s also functional—it helps stabilize the seamlines and edges in the absence of actual seams to do the job.

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it has just enough detail to keep everyone happy. the result is a project that is no fuss, no muss to construct, but keeps its shape and great fit, too, for those hardwearing customers.

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erica has created a kit which includes pattern and knitter’s choice of three delicious BNWs yarns—please click here to check that out.  some of our yarn quantities are low, so we’ve listed the most popular sizes only, but ALL sizes are available on request—if you don’t see the kit for your color choice and size, please email operations@knitspot.com and erica will be happy to set you up!

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but of course, if you live close by and want to see our samples in person or put your own kit together, come visit us at the bare naked wools boutique. summer is the time for a fun yarn adventure with friends—take advantage of the fine weather to make the trip! we always have something in the shop that isn’t listed in the online store—you might even get a glimpse of something we’re keeping under wraps for the moment . . .

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ok, i’ll stop—enough teasing already.

to purchase pattern only or view complete pattern information, please click here to purchase in our knitspot online shop and here to purchase in my ravelry pattern shop.
(if you wish the pattern to appear in your ravelry library, please use this ravelry store link, thanks!)

and just for good measure, click here to view the yarn kit option.

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looks like it’s going to be a terrific holiday weekend after all—mostly sunny where we live (at least, that’s the story at the moment, haha). we are heading over to a big annual picnic party at a friend’s place and then sunday we are celebrating the graduation of our dear friend helena (hmm, maybe SHE can model the cotton sweater!)

hope you have a wonderful weekend planned; eat lots of grilled treats and fresh berries.

shell game

anne wrote this just before lunchtime:

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ahhh, i’m back to the soothing tones of knitting on my hemp blend shell project.

i laid it aside for a few days last week in order to finish up a large secret project i was eager to complete. i’m like that—while i love to have several projects going at once for variety, once i find myself in the home stretch on something big, i just want to get it off the needles and see how it turned out.

i wonder; am i like that because i’m a designer and every project is somewhat of a mystery until its completion? i don’t really hear anyone else talking about a bad case of finishitis, but i get it all the time. in fact, i often shilly shally about starting a project when i’m not absolutely convinced i have my strategy in order.

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of course, a great yarn can serve to mask many, MANY misgivings and even lead me to knit myself into a corner from poor planning. not the case here, thank goodness—i am more in love with our new hemp yarn each day AND the shell is progressing beautifully, though i really did throw caution to the wind and cast on without much of a plan (it’s a simple shell, for heaven’s sake!). so far all the parts are falling into place without a fight; sorta sets the exact tone i wanted with this piece—fresh and uncomplicated.

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i finished up the front piece some time ago—i know it was early last week, but honestly, it may as well have been last year for all i remember (my days tend to blur into each other). isn’t it kind of cool how the fabric creases like paper? no worries—it doesn’t feel anything like paper, but it does speak about how crisp and cool the fabric is. and so light, like a breath of air.

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i started with a four ounce skein and after knitting that whole front piece, i still have about two-thirds left over. wow—i might be able to get a sleeve out of it after all. right now, my plan is to complete it as a semi-sleeveless style, with an armhole finish long enough to cover the top of the shoulder.

but now i’m thinking that i’ll have enough yarn to knit a pair of sleeves that hit just above the elbow and make a second, sleeveless top in another shade when the sample skeins arrive.

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once the front was off the needles, i cast on right away for the back piece and started the garter stitch hem. for some reason, that first three inches took a while, but i think that’s because i was working so hard on both the knitting and the pattern for the other thing i had going.

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i did work on it here and there when i needed a small, brainless project to knit during meetings and car rides. but i didn’t get much further than the hem until monday.

you might have noticed that the fabric seems a bit uneven or insubstantial. part of that is definitely the character of the cloth—the blend IS a bit uneven and quirky, but not so much that it lacks integrity as a fabric. i personally like the texture; it lends a nice character to otherwise plain knitting, but not so much as to be disturbing in lace patterns.

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and part of the inconsistency we are seeing in the fabric for this project is because i am knitting with the unwashed sample skein. this yarn is just as it is when it comes off the spinning equipment—it hasn’t been soaked and washed yet, so the fiber isn’t quite as soft and definitely not as airy.

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you can see that the washed skein on the left, from which i i knit my swatches, is brighter, poofier, a little fuzzier, and has much more body that the unwashed skein on the right.

i think that in this case, the washed yarn is a bit nicer to knit with and all of our production skeins will be washed at the mill. they will still transform a bit when you wash your garment at home, but not as drastically and you won’t have to plan around that.

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my shell is designed to be the fabric that i swatched, so once i wash it, it will change considerably—in this case the finished piece will be wider and a little shorter than it looks here, while the fabric will be more fluid and at the same time, more cohesive, like my swatches (plus, cleaner and brighter).

that reminds me—we need to come up with names for out two new summer yarns. must put that on my to-do list. suggestions are welcome, no guarantees.

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i’ve made considerable progress on the back since i completed my other project. on monday afternoon i finished up the hem section, changed needles and began the faster work in stockinette. because it’s such a simple garment, i’m trying something a bit different with the shape—i added a little short row shaping to the center back to create a downward curve over the hips. it adds maybe an inch and  half to the center back length.

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as of now i am past the waist and the body decreases and have begun increasing back to the underarm. in about three inches i will begin the armhole shaping and after that, the rest will fly. i’m excited—i could maybe have a new top to wear to helena’s graduation party on sunday!

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immersing myself in knitting to finish up a big project usually translates into putting other necessary tasks on the back burner—like garden work. well, we did also have a lot of very rainy days, so in my defense, we haven’t had good weather for working outdoors. yet the garden waits for no man—i think everything has doubled—and in some cases tripled—in size since last week’s photo.

i will take some close up photos for the next blog post so you can see what’s happening on the ground, but for one thing, i’m thrilled that nearly every chard seedling i transplanted has taken off and is flourishing. of course, the weather has been exactly what the greens love—cool, overcast, and wet. the original plantings will actually need to be thinned again very soon, which means i have to find space for more transplants.

don’t tell david, but i am eyeing the flower beds and imagining chard edgings . . .

heaven only knows what i’m going to do with all the chard, but i’m not complaining. haha, if we don’t start selling some more yarn, we may be living on it later in the year!

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while ours is about a week away from being big enough to provide a meal, i was gifted a beautiful bunch of homegrown chard by my friend kris the other day and on saturday morning, i divided it up into a couple of meals. first i separated the leafy green parts form the stalks and wrapped those in damp toweling to keep in the fridge for week night omelettes.

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i chopped the multicolored stems into chunks to throw into a mirepoix for soup (yes, it’s still actually soup weather here, haha). i pulled purple and yellow onions from our garden, along with parsley, basil, and oregano.

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i took out one of the remaining cartons of last summer’s tomatoes from the freezer and opened a couple cans of chick peas (i have no luck cooking those from scratch; they always turn out awful). i also cut up some waxy yellow potatoes and drained  big jar of roasted peppers.

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i wanted to make that spicy chick pea and tomato soup i had cooked while i was in NYC; i thought david would enjoy it.

he did and it was yummy—i forgot to take pictures of the result, but it looked very similar to the original pot. yum yum.

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yesterday i picked two tiny zucchini plus some male flowers and david cooked eggs for dinner using these plus the chard leaves i cleaned the other day. it was the best omelet i’ve eaten all year.

i’m going to stop now because our test knitter is waiting for a pattern and i need to get back to work on that. tomorrow we are releasing another new sweater pattern, so don’t go far—we’ll want you on hand to celebrate with us!

pride

anne wrote this mid-afternoon:

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so happy to wake up this morning in a nation that now ensures marriage equality for all.

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so when erica got to the office this morning and opened the shop, we had some fun creating rainbows to participate in a yarn world day of celebration.

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we found rainbows in all shades, just like the people we rub shoulders with daily.

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some are cool and sophisticated, others are warm and inviting.

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i happen to own a hand knit sweater in every color we needed, yay.

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have a wonderful weekend; i’m elbow-deep in writing a pattern while the place is quiet—i’ll be back with knitting next time!

mixed greens

anne wrote this in the wee hours:

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our area was literally engulfed in rain during the time i was in new york and for several days after my return. it was so dark and dreary in fact, that i caught myself dozing off at my desk at the most unlikely times (like 9:15 am after waking up at 7!).

it wasn’t all bad though—our garden certainly got off to a healthy start with all of that delicious rain to feed it. but the weeds also benefitted and by the weekend, things were looking more than a little bedraggled out there.

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so when the skies cleared on monday and actually stayed that way into the evening, david and i made it our business to get out to the garden for some much needed cleanup.

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when i first got home last thursday, the swiss chard were mere sprouts, an inch high with a couple of cotyledons. by sunday afternoon they were six inches tall with several sets of true leaves and in dire need of thinning. i knew if i didn’t get it done on monday, it would be several days before i would be able to get back to it and by then the roots would have set, making the job more difficult.

so first i got to work on that, gently removing seedlings that were growing one on top of the next. the largest and most intact ones i replanted all around the garden, wherever i could find space; i figure they should “take” somewhere or other. there almost can’t be too many greens  . . . says she.
(i love greens; they are my favorite garden thing and i could eat them every day. that said, i have almost no time to deal with a boatload of garden produce each day, so we shall see!)

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there were many, many seedlings that were much too small or broken to transplant; these i placed in a small basket and plunged into an ice bath inside the house to soak and wash. after our garden work was done for the night (essentially, when it got too dark to see), we made big salads for dinner and used these as an ingredient. tiny green sprouts like these are one of the most nutritionally dense foods you can eat—go us.

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the next thing on my agenda was pruning the tomato plants. tomatoes produce best when they have few leggy limbs to divert energy from the fruits. lateral growth should be nipped in the bud because it encourages overgrowth of leggy, nonproductive limbs. this takes some time but is SO worth the trouble, especially if you are gardening in a smaller space. i will refer you to the experts for actual advice, demonstration, and illustration of tomato pruning:
CLICK HERE TO READ MORE ABOUT PRUNING TOMATOES and CLICK HERE FOR VIDEO

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our basil is doing wonderfully this year as well—david interspersed it with the tomatoes and it seems very happy (unlike our previous couple of years, when most of our basil failed). you might have noticed that he also put down some black cloth to discourage weeds—something new for us. it will keep some moisture in the soil on hotter days as well and help the mounds keep their shape, too.

BTW, the mounds really showed their advantage during the rainy weeks—the soil drained very well and there was next to no puddles laying around the garden (and by extension, very few insects or nasty fungus).

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this morning i was up at the crack of dawn and went to visit the garden for some photos before the sunlight got too harsh. still damp out there, but with everything weeded, thinned, and trimmed up, the garden looked much, MUCH better.

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tomatoes looking strong and straight, with plenty of space around their stems for air circulation (the better to keep fungus away).

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potatoes growing taller by the hour—they are looking super this year as well. we plant everything in rotation except for the tomatoes (because of their growing frames, we will move them less often). this year the potatoes are in the area where i had greens last year.

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the greens kind of failed in that spot because the earth was so heavy that they couldn’t put down a good tap root. this year we planted potatoes there instead, so they could go to work breaking up some of that clay soil. david made mounds on top of them planted with onions, leeks, and some peppers; garlic is also nearby. with all the root vegetables in one place, we can rotate greens over there next year (leaf follows roots).

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on the other side of the tomatoes, closer to the back street, we have rows of squash, eggplant, beans, and greens. the squash is looking very well so far; fingers crossed that it stays that way.

we have a great variety of squashes in all shapes and colors. another vegetable i love to cook with when it’s fresh form the garden—hopefully, it won’t be long before these first ones are ready.

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look at my eggplant!! i am so pleased over this one—i would have picked it by now but i really want to take it just before i’m ready to cook it and that will be friday night, for either a thai or indian curry. my mouth is already watering. round and oblong eggplants are also on their way to go with the squash into large pots of ratatouille.

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and last but not least at the very back of the garden, my green beans have started climbing the fence—they are on their way and looking good. we just have to make sure now to keep those weekends free in late july and august for putting stuff by when it all comes to fruition.

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remember what i said the other day about those lilies? there you have it, they are blooming.

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around the corner, the dye bed is exploding with meadowsweet blooms—how beautiful are these?

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they are complemented by tansy, also in bloom—no wonder i’m almost choking on pollen, haha.

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out near the front of our yard, the yucca is heavy with flowers as well—i remember when we moved here and this plant was a single short stem; these are well over six feet in height, maybe seven.

i know that these are the best days of gardening, when all the plants are still growing and the weather hasn’t gotten to them. june is so beautiful, but july can be very, very hard on them. let’s hope we don’t have too many big temperature swings or overly dry weeks; i would love to have a successful garden year for once, haha; the last few have been discouraging.

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it’s positively inspiring, to be able to look, touch, smell, and dream on all this luscious green. and you know where i’m funneling all of that inspiration, don’t you? if you guessed ENVY club, that would be correct. excitement is ginning up over in our ravelry clubhouse—if you need a little taste of what’s to come, i highly recommend a visit there, haha. kat is bubbling over to know what we’re going to knit first—let’s keep her company while she exhausts herself guessing, haha.

signups for ENVY club will close in one week; we have some single spots and some double dip upgrades available now, but when they’re gone, there won’t be more. our yarn orders for the entire club are now finalized—get these last ones before someone else does!