aspergillum

Posted on 4 CommentsPosted in Bare Naked Wools, designing, lace/shawls, patterns

fresh and airy pullovers with an easy fit are summer essentials, especially for travelers. the aspergillum tunic (or crop top), is a great example—pull it on as a beach coverup or pair it with strappy sandals and a cami for evening cocktails—this piece has multiple lives.

knit here in deliciously cool hempshaugh lace (color buckwheat), it is light and slightly drapey. plus, it packs and unpacks without a wrinkle and dries within hours of washing.

worn loose with lots of ease or just a little, the fabric is stretchy and comfortable to fit a range of sizes from XS to 5X.

the unusual cable-and-lace stitch pattern is a real attention-getter, inspired by the texture of natural sea sponges.  deeply ribbed hems and neck finishes complete the look with a rill of shifting rib that ripples in the breeze.

the garment is knit in two simple, rectangular pieces with a bit of neck shaping; a drop shoulder forms the “sleeves” which are completed with cuffs knit on to the armhole openings in ribbing to match the hem and neck finishes.

shown here is the tunic in size S/M (40 inches)—on ying fen (above) it is worn with eight inches of ease; on raina (below) it is worn with three or four inches of ease.

this top would be equally delicious (and a little bit more glam) in bare naked wools deco lace or chebris lace; i think the mohair option would be super sexy for fall and winter.

want to know more about aspergillum or ready to cast on NOW?

click here to purchase the pattern in our online shop and click here to to purchase the pattern on ravelry.

and don’t forget to add your project to your ravelry notebook and share your progress in our bare naked wools ravelry group—bring yourself and your knitting for a fun, relaxing group chat.

Lace3—oh, the possibilities!

Posted on 4 CommentsPosted in Bare Naked Wools, designing, lace/shawls, spinning and fiber

as spring finally commences with sprouting, blooming, and unfurling a fresh array of colors and fascinating forms, i’ve been busy putting together ideas for my lace³ pattern subscription.

there couldn’t be a more exciting or inspiring time of year to be thinking about new lace projects—if you’ve been following my work for even a short time, you know that translating natural forms into stitches is an important aspect of my designer voice. at this time of year, i am literally surrounded by ideas for motifs and line work with which to fill our rectangular shapes.

now to think about the yarns we might use to bring those ideas to life! one aspect of this project that’s very important to me is flexibility. because it can be resized with ease, the rectangular form is universally friendly to a wide range of yarn types and weights—the same design can be worked in finer or heavier yarns to achieve different effects.

fine yarns produce sheer fabrics suffused with light, showing off delicate line work and semi-transparent shapes; heavier yarns amp up the scale, making for bold, deeply embossed lines and voluptuous forms, along with a gutsier overall fabric. some knitters have a love for one or the other and some of us like to mix it up so that we always have a project going that suits our knitting mood.

as my series of “little nothings” scarf patterns has proven over the years, knitters love this flexibility—these simple rectangular designs have been translated into all manner of larger and smaller projects, from scarves to stoles to baby blankets—and in all types of yarns. and so i hope it will be with the lace³ subscription projects, that knitters will use my basic designs as written, or fiddle with them if they please, to create end results that are just right.

i know that some of you have been dreaming on what you will purchase with your discount coupon—thank you for all of the fun comments you’ve been adding to the discussion in our lace³ ravelry thread!

as promised, i’ve prepared a list to share of the yarns i will most likely work with. for this list, i’ve taken choices from our bare naked wools yarn shop, to offer suggestions for those who’d like to use the $10 coupon included with early signups (click here and purchase now if you’d like to get one too!). i may in the future toss my stash to come up with hand-dyed suggestions and i may even knit a few samples with treasures retrieved through stash diving.

full disclosure though—being that this is a design project that extends a year into the future, it’s possible i may change my mind about knitting with one or two of these yarns myself. if that happens, my intention is that someone in our sample circle will knit with the the yarn from the original list, so that we have an example to show off. note that the list contains more than a half dozen yarns for just six design installments—i like to keep my options open and i feel that any combination of these yarns will work. we’d like to show you several sample options for each installment and i hope to knit more than one for at least some of the installments, while other knitters may help with the rest.

the good news is that even if my choices change or vary, these designs will work with many different yarns; they are excellent stashbuster projects! if a yarn you love is not on the list or drops from my list in the future, you can rest assured that it will still be lovely in almost any of the designs and you will enjoy that project even more for personalizing it with an alternate yarn choice.

the colors shown here are not necessarily the ones i will knit with; i chose photos from our archives that best represent each yarn type.

you may decide that a range of soft silver and blue-gray is right up your alley . . .

or that a soft warm palette suits you and your wardrobe better.

maybe a series of darks are your thing or you like to work with toothy, textured  yarns as opposed to kitteny soft ones.

i find enjoyment and inspiration in a mix of everything; i like to follow one yarn with another that is a different shade and has completely different qualities. i do not make rules for myself about colors or fibers i supposed should and should not wear. and anyway, i like to give away a lot of the accessories i knit, so i allow myself the freedom of exploration. one-skein scarf projects are a great way to try out a yarn that is new to me, especially if i’m considering it for a garment design.

several people have asked about yardages and here i’m going to be a bit vague because it really depends on so many factors—we find that knitterly variations (such as personal gauge and knitting style) can alter yardage by a surprising amount, as can substituting yarn or working at a different gauge than stated. and i want everyone to feel they can take advantage of the flexibility offered here!

while each design will have a stated gauge and yardage for the sample shown, your mileage may vary for a variety of reasons. to prevent knitters from getting bogged down on this point, for the most part these will be the type of projects where you can simply knit til your yarn (or your patience) runs out. you may achieve more or less repeats than i do, but if you start with a skein of equal weight to what i’m using, you should end up with a similar size. scarves and cowls can be knit with single, 4-ounce skeins of fingering or lace yarn, while stoles or blankets will take two or more. if you choose to size up, DK yarns require about fifty percent more yardage. at this point, i really can’t commit to more yardage information than that. to arm yourself with helpful knowledge, i recommend reading through some project notes for my established scarf designs to see how far a single skein of any yarn will go. my lace lessons book also includes helpful information about yarn substitutions and fiber in general.

there is one last last thing—i will almost certainly not be using these yarns in the order they appear below; i’ve got to keep some surprises in my pocket!

are you ready? then here we go!

1. deco lace

deco lace is a tencel/cotton/merino blend with gorgeous sheen that is perfect for summer knitting, as it remains dry to the touch through all weather. never warm or prickly against the neck, its firm twist offers excellent stitch definition and a pearly accent for wool and denim alike, but also drapes into silky, sexy folds. generous yardage allows for a large scarf or stole project.

2. ginny sport (or DK)

ginny is an alpaca/cotton/merino/nylon blend that feels like cashmere. a next-to-the-skin soft yarn with an even softer, fuzzy halo, it makes a remarkably desirable scarf or cowl fabric that drapes into generous, round folds. if you’ve sworn off cotton yarns, this one will make you think again! in the lighter sport weight, it knits up most similarly to our better breakfast fingering yarn; in DK weight it is lush and plump for a warm scarf without the wooliness.

3. better breakfast fingering


better breakfast fingering is an alpaca/merino/nylon blend with all-around appeal. soft, yes—but also sturdy. dehaired alpaca is the magic ingredient, adding ultimate softness without a prickle, for those who may have found other alpaca yarns unwearable. available in eleven natural shades, this signature yarn is a perennial favorite for all types of knits, but is especially lovely for openwork projects with plump stitches—the kind you want for working cable and lace patterns. a smooth profile for easy handling, it blooms with a wonderfully fuzzy halo with a nice bath and some handling.

4. ghillie sock

ghillie sock is spun from 100 percent cheviot wool; if you haven’t heard of it, you can read more about it in this blog post or visit some project pages. this heritage wool fiber has many characteristics that add to its durability, hence its place as the traditional choice for kilt hose, sturdy scottish tweeds, and upholstery. but rarely—and quite unfairly—is a tribute sung to its more delicate characteristics. the lustre and unusual structure of the fiber (helical) makes for a bouncy, airy yarn that simply glows with light when introduced into yarnover patterns. its slightly stiffer hand translates into highly embossed linework and a beautiful blocked finish that keeps its shape for ages. our skeins hold a generous put-up of 600 yards—plenty for a large, lacy piece or one with lots of cables or twist stitches.

5. cabécou lace

cabécou lace, our finest lace offering is the ultimate choice for romantic, heirloom lace pieces. you might think that this kid mohair/silk/coopworth lamb blend, with a whopping 1000 yards per 4-ounce skein will require knitting on toothpicks—but no! in fact, i highly recommend a much larger needle to achieve a gossamer fabric that catches the light on each and every blooming filament. here too, a slightly stiffer fiber blend yields distinct stitch definition and a lasting blocked shape. not to mention a fabric that is virtually weightless and devastatingly sheer.

6. hempshaugh lace

hempshaugh lace, a merino/silk/hemp blend, offers a more rustic, quirky texture than many of our other yarns and is a personal favorite for lots of reasons. it is my summer yarn of choice for tops that i practically live in and for certain kinds of shawls and scarves. its fluid, drape is wonderfully forgiving in garments, but could prove challenging for rectangles that keep their shape. i’m choosing this yarn as a wild card with a special project in mind, with a plan to counter its naturally too-soft tendencies with a clever construction strategy. hoping some of you will play along with me, but if the prospect sounds daunting, be assured that alternate yarns will prove equally compelling.

7. fresh lace

fresh lace is a combination of silk and linen—if you’ve heard that linen is too hard on the hands, then this yarn will rescue its reputation. unimaginably soft to knit with, the fiber also plumps up nicely with lots of body when washed; it makes for gorgeous garter stitch fabric. its brilliant whiteness inspire its name—fresh. while i’m tempted to kick off the subscription in july with this selection, a design that will be absolutely perfect for early spring is whispering to be knit instead and i’ve got it slotted in closer to the end of the lineup.

8. chebris lace

chebris lace is a mohair lover’s dream yarn—soft and glimmering, it knits up quickly on bigger needles and blooms with lush, fluffy softness after a wash and some handling. fabric that flutters in the slightest breeze is the prize for those who choose to knit with this confection of a yarn. spun a bit heavier than our cabécou blend, it’s a great introduction to mohair fiber and laceweight yarn—totally manageable for newbies and a complete pleasure for the more experienced knitter.

9. stone soup fingering

stone soup fingering c’mon now—you know i wouldn’t leave this selection off of any personal yarn list! after all, a day without SSF is like a day without sunshine. i am totally psyched about showing you yet another desirable lace pattern to knit with this tweedy, rustic, lovable stuff. lest you think i’m talking nonsense just to move this yarn off the shelf, i swear, i’m not—just ask my friend katharine; she sleeps in her fringetree shawl, knit with stone soup fingering, she likes it that much (true story!). and if you feel too shy to ask her, you can peruse a variety of stone soup lace projects by clicking here. who knows, this might be your wildcard yarn!

so that’s my list from the shelves of our bare naked wools yarn shop—please feel free to write us with questions or leave a comment and we’ll do our best to answer. to recap, those who sign up for lace³ before 7/10/2018 will receive a $10 credit toward the purchase of three skeins or more, while supplies last. david has mailed out coupon codes to everyone who signed up already; you should be good to go! for those joining up as we speak, yours will be sent along shortly after your purchase.

we plan to present a couple more posts about project yarn before the patterns begin release in july; stay tuned for ideas and inspiration!

edison for president (please?)

Posted on 4 CommentsPosted in Bare Naked Wools, book reviews/events, designing, lace/shawls

if you receive our newsletter each week, you may already know that my edison shawl design made it into the mason-dixon march mayhem bracket, neck and shoulders category.

O.M.G.—this was totally unexpected and thrilling; thank you ann and kay!

and voting begins today, so don’t waste a minute—please skedaddle over to the MDK website to cast your votes (and please save one vote for edison, ok?).

this silvery, somewhat slinky (but not too), wedge-shaped shawl is such a great add-on piece for any season—cool and smooth in bare naked wools deco fingering yarn, it is just the thing wonder woman would pull from her belt to toss over those bare shoulders when the breeze kicks up.

it can also be wrapped much closer to the neck as a warming layer in windy weather, then unfurled to drape over evening wear, once inside. this design was the final installment in the 2017 bare naked knitspot club and was a real hit with our members—visit the edison project page to see some of their beautiful results and helpful comments.

while the lace pattern looks terribly complex with criss-crossing lines and knots, it is actually a quite straightforward ribbing arrangement with few moving parts. the secret lies in a couple of cable crosses every so often that squeeze the ribbing together, first in one column, then the next—and wah-LA!—you’ve got yourself a web of intrigue.

the knitting begins with just a few stitches and increases along one side only. then, just when you might be getting a wee bit bored with that ribbing pattern, the openwork melts into a series of large, bell-shaped ribs that form the finishing edge, ruffle-like but not ruffle-y.

using a yarn with a soft sheen and silky hand will highlight the embossed patterning throughout the shawl body. the pattern includes two sizes—petite and tall—but is easily resized to suit a particular yardage (or if you run short, unplanned). it would be lovely in BNWs hempshaugh fingering with it’s silky, airy hand or ginny sport with its flowing, cashmere-y drape. and how about fresh lace? with its linen/silk content, it’s a natural for summer loveliness. or treat yourself to the original deco fingering yarn!

to vote in the march mayhem bracket, please visit mason-dixon knitting and cast your ballots! and while you’re there, please also vote for mary o’shea’s marabou mitts, knit in confection sport yarn and included in the mini skeins bracket. we are so excited and happy for mary and for BNWs representation!

to purchase the edison pattern or read more details, please see the listing in the knitspot pattern shop or in my ravelry pattern shop. we’ll be doing an edison KAL in our rarely group too—click here to join us or to see everyone’s progress and yarn choices so far.

three haps

Posted on 1 CommentPosted in Bare Naked Wools, designing, lace/shawls, patterns, spinning and fiber

in april, just as the first bright greens of spring were emerging, we released three hap designs in our bare naked knitspot club to be knit in elemental affects shetland wool.

and it is with great pleasure that i’m now able to offer these pattern for general release—they were very popular with our clubbies and many people outside the club have been asking when they could start knitting them too.

from top to bottom above, we have the bold and sassy jack tar triangle, followed by the muirburn triangle, and then by the eshaness scarf/stole. each pattern includes instructions for two sizes and four colors, but both are easily adjusted to suit your taste for more or less color changes and bigger or smaller final size.

our friend kathy recently knit this pretty sample in four shades of our tweedy stone soup fingering yarn; it’s so light and airy, but also rustic and cozy to wear; i love it.

the yarn is light and soft, the fabric will flutter prettily in the breeze. it also handles the light just beautifully, filling up with a glow at the merest hint of sun.

muirburn and eshaness are designed using the same stitch patterns and colors, but make use of the shetland shades in different ways. the effect in each design is soft and subtle, with the yarn reflecting the landscape of the scottish heather moors.

jack tar is designed to show off the intensity of the natural shetland colors, which range from deepest black to white—twenty-one natural shades in all to accent the bold sailor’s stripes along the hem.

which one of these designs reflects your personality?

i think the intense discussion over the answers to this question made this installment the most fun for our clubbies.

shown here are the petite size shawls and the scarf version of the rectangular piece. this small size can be made with about five ounces of wool, using something light and airy.

the stiffness and luminosity of this natural shetland or our stone soup fingering yarn is just perfect; the yarn helps the light openwork keep its blocked shape and luminous appearance where something more springy would weigh the fabric down. i imagine they would be stunning in our chebris lace mohair blend as well for the same reasons.

the simple stitches just fly off the needles in these easy to work yarns—the perfect fast knit to consider for a special holiday gift. take a look at our clubbies’ project pages for expanded color ideas and notes.

to view and purchase pattern only, please click here, here, or here for ravelry purchase and click here, here, or here for knitspot pattern shop purchase.