edison for president (please?)

Posted on 4 CommentsPosted in Bare Naked Wools, book reviews/events, designing, lace/shawls

if you receive our newsletter each week, you may already know that my edison shawl design made it into the mason-dixon march mayhem bracket, neck and shoulders category.

O.M.G.—this was totally unexpected and thrilling; thank you ann and kay!

and voting begins today, so don’t waste a minute—please skedaddle over to the MDK website to cast your votes (and please save one vote for edison, ok?).

this silvery, somewhat slinky (but not too), wedge-shaped shawl is such a great add-on piece for any season—cool and smooth in bare naked wools deco fingering yarn, it is just the thing wonder woman would pull from her belt to toss over those bare shoulders when the breeze kicks up.

it can also be wrapped much closer to the neck as a warming layer in windy weather, then unfurled to drape over evening wear, once inside. this design was the final installment in the 2017 bare naked knitspot club and was a real hit with our members—visit the edison project page to see some of their beautiful results and helpful comments.

while the lace pattern looks terribly complex with criss-crossing lines and knots, it is actually a quite straightforward ribbing arrangement with few moving parts. the secret lies in a couple of cable crosses every so often that squeeze the ribbing together, first in one column, then the next—and wah-LA!—you’ve got yourself a web of intrigue.

the knitting begins with just a few stitches and increases along one side only. then, just when you might be getting a wee bit bored with that ribbing pattern, the openwork melts into a series of large, bell-shaped ribs that form the finishing edge, ruffle-like but not ruffle-y.

using a yarn with a soft sheen and silky hand will highlight the embossed patterning throughout the shawl body. the pattern includes two sizes—petite and tall—but is easily resized to suit a particular yardage (or if you run short, unplanned). it would be lovely in BNWs hempshaugh fingering with it’s silky, airy hand or ginny sport with its flowing, cashmere-y drape. and how about fresh lace? with its linen/silk content, it’s a natural for summer loveliness. or treat yourself to the original deco fingering yarn!

to vote in the march mayhem bracket, please visit mason-dixon knitting and cast your ballots! and while you’re there, please also vote for mary o’shea’s marabou mitts, knit in confection sport yarn and included in the mini skeins bracket. we are so excited and happy for mary and for BNWs representation!

to purchase the edison pattern or read more details, please see the listing in the knitspot pattern shop or in my ravelry pattern shop. we’ll be doing an edison KAL in our rarely group too—click here to join us or to see everyone’s progress and yarn choices so far.

three haps

Posted on 1 CommentPosted in Bare Naked Wools, designing, lace/shawls, patterns, spinning and fiber

in april, just as the first bright greens of spring were emerging, we released three hap designs in our bare naked knitspot club to be knit in elemental affects shetland wool.

and it is with great pleasure that i’m now able to offer these pattern for general release—they were very popular with our clubbies and many people outside the club have been asking when they could start knitting them too.

from top to bottom above, we have the bold and sassy jack tar triangle, followed by the muirburn triangle, and then by the eshaness scarf/stole. each pattern includes instructions for two sizes and four colors, but both are easily adjusted to suit your taste for more or less color changes and bigger or smaller final size.

our friend kathy recently knit this pretty sample in four shades of our tweedy stone soup fingering yarn; it’s so light and airy, but also rustic and cozy to wear; i love it.

the yarn is light and soft, the fabric will flutter prettily in the breeze. it also handles the light just beautifully, filling up with a glow at the merest hint of sun.

muirburn and eshaness are designed using the same stitch patterns and colors, but make use of the shetland shades in different ways. the effect in each design is soft and subtle, with the yarn reflecting the landscape of the scottish heather moors.

jack tar is designed to show off the intensity of the natural shetland colors, which range from deepest black to white—twenty-one natural shades in all to accent the bold sailor’s stripes along the hem.

which one of these designs reflects your personality?

i think the intense discussion over the answers to this question made this installment the most fun for our clubbies.

shown here are the petite size shawls and the scarf version of the rectangular piece. this small size can be made with about five ounces of wool, using something light and airy.

the stiffness and luminosity of this natural shetland or our stone soup fingering yarn is just perfect; the yarn helps the light openwork keep its blocked shape and luminous appearance where something more springy would weigh the fabric down. i imagine they would be stunning in our chebris lace mohair blend as well for the same reasons.

the simple stitches just fly off the needles in these easy to work yarns—the perfect fast knit to consider for a special holiday gift. take a look at our clubbies’ project pages for expanded color ideas and notes.

to view and purchase pattern only, please click here, here, or here for ravelry purchase and click here, here, or here for knitspot pattern shop purchase.

anticipating autumn

Posted on 2 CommentsPosted in Bare Naked Wools, lace/shawls, patterns

And now for the next offering in our ensemble summer lace KAL—this beautiful crescent shawl in two sizes, designed by kirsten kapur, named Anticipating Autumn.

this is the piece to start now, in preparation for the cooler nights of september and the chilly mornings of october! kirsten chose to knit her sample in our luscious ginny sport yarn—this soft, cuddly yarn makes the ultimate in snuggly fabrics, with a cashmere-y halo, pearly sheen, and beautiful drape. the color shown here is georgia, a cool, silvery gray.

worked from the top down in a half-octagon construction of four pie-shaped wedges, the body of the shawl is knit in brioche stitch to create a light, lofty fabric that swirls effortlessly around the shoulders and neck.

a deep lace hem of lotus flowers and mesh completes the design and kirsten used her signature crochet bind off for a loopy, stretchy finish.

the design is shown here in the petite size, which takes just two skeins of ginny sport. we’ve been experimenting as well with the fabric; we just received a shop sample today in our deco fingering yarn that is a knockout in our new bronze shade—we’ll bring you photos of this new one as soon as david can take some!

as kirsten explains in the pattern notes, this shawl could really be knit in any size yarn as long as the appropriate needle size is used and you swatch to make sure you like the fabric. i can just imagine this piece knit up in cozy stone soup fingering OR DK—or how about one of our mohair sport options? cabécou brillant sport or chebris sport would offer a fabric beyond luscious. need a cooler, lighter fabric, even for fall? then hempshaugh fingering would be another great choice!

to get started david has created yarn/pattern kits for the anticipating autumn shawl in all shades of bare naked wools ginny sport and deco fingering yarns. when ordering a kit, please add a note if you’d like to receive your pattern in ravelry.

interested in knitting this piece and joining our ensemble summer lace KAL on ravelry?
to view and purchase pattern only, please click here for ravelry purchase and click here for knitspot pattern shop purchase.

many, many thinks to our friend kirsten kapur for this wonderful late-summer design, perfectly in tune with the days to come.

 

gotta get back to nashville

Posted on 9 CommentsPosted in Bare Naked Wools, designing, home and family, lace/shawls, projects

i’m writing this post on tuesday because by the time you read it, i’ll be on my way to nashville with ellen, where we will exhibit at the super summer knit together market day. i am pretty excited about this trip; i lived in nashville during the early 1990s for a few years, when it was a fairly sleepy small city. now it’s grown and changed so much; i can’t WAIT to see it!

this will be a great opportunity to see our friends from the area; if you plan to come to the market day on saturday, be sure to stop by and say hello. we’ll have knit naked bags, all manner of patterns, and BNWs yarns in old favorites as well as the new colors we’ve been teasing on social media. plus, glamorous samples from ensemble collections and my own design portfolio will be on display.

such as this costa figueira pullover tunic in deco fingering yarn, in the chrome shade—one of a few fresh samples knit in a newer yarn. i just love it and will probably be wearing it on saturday.

it is SO cool. very many thanks to ellen’s friend coletta, who knit it for us. i’m sure she has an awesome ravelry page but i don’t know her rav name!

and then our long-time friend kathy knit this caïssa cardigan in ginny DK, our lusciously soft blend of cotton/alpaca/merino in the mississippi shade. doesn’t ellen look gorgeous wearing it? i had it on too (caïssa is an old favorite) but my photo doesn’t do the sweater justice and i think you’d rather see it on ellen anyway.

colletta and kathy really pushed the pedal to the metal on these and got them done in just a couple of weeks—there’s still time to knit one and wear it for late summer, just when you’ll be looking for a sweater to throw on at the end of the evening . . .

and of course you’ll be able to see and fondle the extravagantly soft oana cardigan designed by elena nodel for the BNWs winter 2017 ensemble collection. the sample is knit in BNWs chebris sport, one of our luxury mohair offerings.

this design would look (and feel!) fantastic in the über-soft soufflé shade, new to the chebris line.

if i could give you a squishing experience with these skeins, i would—i think it’s the softest shade yet, so yummy. it’s a beautiful oatmeal color, threaded with a mix of warm brown, white, and gray fibers. it maintains that silvery sheen that polishes all of the shades in our mohair lines (the secret to that is great quality mohair fiber).

also super-floaty in cabécou brillant sport, if you like that extra hit of luxury with your cardigan. we just got restocked in a shade we haven’t had for ages—check out the new batch of poivre.

by the way, doug tells me that in may and june, sales of the oana pattern raised $2,115 which we are forwarding the go fund me for elena’s cancer treatment. thank you to everyone who purchased a donation pattern or yarn kit during our fundraising period; they are almost at their goal!

behind the scenes here, the office has been abuzz with the activities of packing and prepping for SSK. ellen has been preparing and packing samples and kits for the booth, doug pulled many skeins of our most luscious yarns to fill our cubbies, and Cardigan supervised; nothing gets by her.

at the house, i washed and freshened up a selection of other favorite samples to display front and center, along with the new samples i showed you at the top of the post. we are ready to greet you, nashville knitters—come visit our booth!

in designing news, i’ve been diligently (and pretty monogamously) knitting my way up the back piece of my aspergillum tunic, which i’m enjoying immensely. with no shaping to keep track of, this stitch pattern becomes totally engrossing and addictive to work. mean, really—i can hardly tear myself away, and not just because i have a deadline.

addiction leads to great progress and i can often finish off a 24-row repeat in couple of hours of morning knitting. i will confess, i don’t keep track of my knitting time too carefully (and why? that would totally defeat the purpose).

even the wrong side texture of this fabric is amazing i think; i just love it to bits.

anyway, i’m almost done with the back now—that pink marker is the underarm point and i am a repeat or so past it today; two repeats for the armhole depth and less to start the back neck shaping. this top has shaping for both the front and back neck because the neck band is wide. also, beause i like summery tops to be a bit more open at the neck.

i do think, however, that i might have fashioned the front neck to be a little too deep for the width. i’ve ben changing my mind every day about whether to go back in and remove a bit from the shoulder height. for fitting me personally, i think i should do it, but i’m more “shallow” at the neck and armholes than most people. i know i can add it back into the pattern before tech editing if it seems too high later on—that would be a minor change.

i just love this photo that i took yesterday, of the unfinished back and the blocked front, side by side. i’m so excited to be in the home stretch on this design; i’ve been patient til now but i want to see how it all pulls together. keep your fingers crossed for me!

ok, gotta go now and finish up my packing. i’m bringing my tunic project to finish, along with some secret design swatching and a travel project i started in may—my see the sea shawl design in our smoothie gradient (i’ll show you that next time).

i’m pretty sure that Someone doesn’t know i’ll be gone for a few days; it’s hard to convey to her what’s happening without making her nervous. she’s learning to be secure, but not sure yet. i feel bad that for her, i will just disappear without any explanation. un fortunately, she doesn’t FaceTime yet.

at least i know she’ll be in good hands while i’m gone . . .