river to sea

i’ve been taking long walks every day since i’ve been away, but especially since i got to london—it’s the most efficient way for me to get my exercise here.

on friday, i finally found my way to the river from alice’s flat, after i misnavigated on thursday and ended up on a more inland route

once i got on the right track, i had a wonderfully clear path along the thames from chelsea harbor to the battersea power station and beyond.

i stumbled upon this statue of james mcneill whistler, one of my favorite painters, tucked into a little parklet next to a bridge.

it was a very cold ramble—the wind was pretty fierce that day, but i buttoned up and walked faster in an effort to keep warm (still, the soles of my feet were actually numb in my mesh running shoes, haha).

once off the river, i managed to get myself turned around and walked quite a distance out of my way before realizing i might not be headed back to alice’s house (i don’t mind getting lost; it’s easy enough to correct one’s way).

on that day however, there wasn’t too much leeway for wandering—we were headed to cornwall in the afternoon and had a train, then a plane to catch. once i piloted my way home and got my stuff organized, we departed for victoria station.

i took some photos out the window on the way to gatwick

they’re mostly unrecognizable, but quite painterly and i thought you’d enjoy them.

i just love that one; i think it’s my favorite

this one too—they’re kind-of whistleresque, don’t you think? well, maybe not so much, haha.

inside the train, we knitted while alice finalized some last minute details

i pulled out my sock for the short trip and finished the gusset shaping. once we got to the airport, we received dire warnings from security officials at every turn about how our needles would be confiscated if we tried to get them on the plane, so i packed all the knitting i intended to do on the flight into my checked bag and snuck on only the sock.

which turned out to be a good thing because i got a lot more of the foot completed during the flight. i’m on the toe shaping now; i may go home this weekend with a completed pair of roger socks—finally.

we arrived in cornwall after dark, so we couldn’t see the beach til we woke up on saturday morning, but WOW—what a beach it is and right outside the door of the hotel, too.

the tide was way out yesterday morning, so cookie and i went for a long walk after breakfast and before class.

i had only my phone camera on me, but you can see that even with that, the view is spectacular.

we walked all the way down to that notch between the square cliff and that pointed rock formation to its right—the point where we’d have to climb over rocks to go further. the cliffs along the beach are the most gorgeous dark green colors.

about halfway there, we began to see these large, pointed rocks, covered with barnacles, rising up out of the beach.

it was ridiculously cold, but we kept going anyway. we eventually got to the notch and found that there were taller rocks barring our way forward. it was time to go back and begin the day, anyhow . . .

haha, that is we thought is was ridiculously cold, then we turned to head back to the hotel and faced the wind. let’s just say that on the way back, we did not stop or dally about, taking pictures.

back at the hotel, it was almost time to start the teaching day. i had the unfortunate luck to score this room as my classroom for the day

i know—completely distracting, isn’t it??
no worries, though—we made the best of it.

the beach outside the window is rife with surfers, trying to catch a decent wave.

they look like ants on the water, don’t they?

one thing i especially like about this beach is that it is busy all day with people walking, playing, surfing and enjoying the outdoors.

the changing light throughout the day makes for a constantly-evolving picture from our classrooom.

the beach faces directly west, so by late afternoon, we get the benefit of the sunset.

i’m teaching the marie antoinette project class here at the retreat. we’ve split the students into two groups and we meet each group for half a day each day. so everyone got a chance to spend time in this gorgeous room, knitting a sock yesterday.

today we’ll meet again to work further down the leg; some participants may even be ready to knit their sock heels.

even i am knitting one of these socks—i don’t actually have a sample of the pattern any more, so i figured this was a good opportunity to get one started, at least. i’m using alice’s yarn for this one in a dark, gray/blue/plum colorway.

i don’t know if i’ll finish it, but i’ll try . . . it’s nice to have lots of time to tackle a project class like this, with two days to spread the work out. it gives everyone a chance to spend some focused time getting started and then to have some real knitting time while at the retreat.

if i don’t finish the sock this weekend, i’ll finish it during some future marie class; it can be my new traveling sock.

no pun intended but i’m also making goo headway on my green cabled toque in mountain meadow wools merino. mmmm, just what i need for walking out in that wind. just one more repeat and then to work the peak and i’m done.

it needs a wash to relax the cables a little, but i may start wearing it before that, heh—it’s been pretty cold throughout my UK travels and another good, warm, cushy hat is just the thing i could use.

ok, time now for me to head to breakfast and start my day—next time you hear from me, david should have arrived and we’ll be on our way to scotland, i think!

30 Responses to “river to sea”

  1. josiekitten says:

    I knew you’d love the Cornish beaches! What a perfect place for a classroom, eh?! That Marie Antoinette sock is very pretty. There just aren’t enough hours in the day to knit everything I want to! Safe journey to Scotland.

  2. Roobeedoo says:

    Sigh! Looks like a lovely way to spend the weekend. But never mind, i have a sock to knit and as I am in Scotland already, I don’t have to do any travelling!

  3. fibrefanatic says:

    Fab pictures as always, what is the gorgeous yarn in the first Marie Antoinette picture?

  4. Beth says:

    Wonderful photos! The first one looks like the exact location from the new Sherlock Holmes (Masterpiece).

  5. YarnAddict says:

    Sounds like you’re having a great time. Beaches like that (and the Moors) are one of the great benefits of living down here in Cornwall. it does get cold with that Atlantic wind blowing in. I wish I was there with you. I’m off to Padstow, just up the coast from you, today. My husband and youngest daughter have been walking from the south coast of Cornwall (Fowey) to the North Coast (Padstow) this weekend. Great weather for it.

    Enjoy the rest of your stay in Cornwall!

  6. gluecksfisch says:

    Thanks for the pictures!
    I am planning a trip to London this summer. I wish I could visit Cornwall too, it looks wonderful.

  7. Susie says:

    Oh my gosh, Anne…what memories you are making….

  8. Phoebe says:

    Thanks for sharing Cornwall photos et al. It reminded me of all of the romantic novels set in Cornwall that I liked to read as a teenager.

    Needle confiscation always worries me so glad that the socks were able to travel.

    And yeah, David will be there soon!

  9. Connie says:

    Oh, what great pictures! That beach…WOW! And can I just say that I so want to take one of your classes one of these days.
    Where in Scotland will you be? Wonderful that David will be able to join you.

  10. Chris says:

    Ann, My daughter Jane planned a yarn crawl in NY as part of her Christmas gift to me. Our last stop was Knitty and then on to Isabellas, a favorite of ours, for lunch! what fun! It was MLK Day as she had off. I feel like I just missed you! Enjoy the rest of your trip. Chris

  11. Rani says:

    Oh, I’m just green with envy. What a gorgeous location. I’ve just finished the entire Doc Martin series which was filmed in Port Isaac. I would love to go. And then to add a knitting retreat . . . well. . . it’s just too fun.

  12. Oh, what a treat to see what the beaches on the other side of the Atlantic look like. And you poor thing, having to gaze out those picture windows all day, lol. I’m sure the class was so wonderful that no one even noticed the scenery.

    You must be storing some great scenic inspiration for future pattern designs!

    May your journeys continue well.

  13. jill says:

    I love the time you take to enjoy your setting. You really know how to balance work and pleasure! I know you’ve shared this before, but could you tell us again, your sources for project bags? I’m looking forward to seeing more of your adventures!

  14. Amy says:

    Ever since i hurt my hands last year, I turned to knitting blogs for “comfort”. I have returned to a little knitting but continue to read Knitspot. I love it. The knitting, the yarn, the patterns, the food, the travel, the friends, and the fantastic photos are so fun! I wanted to tell you Thank You for making my hard days better and my better days great!

  15. Anne says:

    I love London! For years on our annual trips to the UK we’d avoid London –then 2 years ago I went for I Knit, and I LOVED IT! Went last year, will be in London again this year at least twice! Can you tell I love London?

    We hope to get to Cornwall this year…..so I’ll check out the beach!

    Love your classroom — wish I was there!

  16. nancy schwartz sternoff says:

    wow i had no idea cornwall is so gorgeous! so glad you got a chance to be outdoors a little. and oooh that marie antoinette…it is way high up on my queue!
    enjoy and get home safely.

  17. Kat says:

    OMG, Anne, these pictures are fabulous! I always feel like I’m traveling with you thanks to the wonderful shots you take and the descriptions you give.

    Hope you have a wonderful time.

  18. Janice says:

    Gorgeous pictures! What a wonderful place for a knit retreat. I always enjoy your blog. Safe journey.

  19. Anne Marie says:

    Thanks for sharing Cornwall with us Anne, I’ve been wanting to see the beaches since I read The Shell Seekers 20+ years ago. Have a wonderful reunion with David.

  20. Sara says:

    I have to ask, where did you get those cute little stitch markers that you’re using?

  21. Rae says:

    Wow, both the knitting & the views are quite stunning! I can’t think of a better place for a knitting retreat. What a treat to be invited to teach there.

  22. Nan says:

    That water look so blue compared to water in CA. I cannot believe how many surfers there are in this cold water. It looks like you and Cookie enjoyed your walk.

  23. DebbieQ says:

    Beautiful pictures. And it is a good time NOT to be in Ohio as we are about to get socked by some very nasty weather.

  24. Tara says:

    Ooh, excellent beach pictures! I agree, that view would have totally distracted me as well.

  25. Eleanor says:

    Anne what wonderful pictures, that bring back childhood memories of coastal walks in Scotland, I can just smell the sea from here.

    What is that wonderful yarn, you say it is one of Alice’s yarns in dark grey/blue/plum. I really like that. When you have a moment, I would love the details on it. Thank you. Enjoy the great old city of Edinburgh.

  26. Leann says:

    Sigh…I LOVE England. London is probably my most favorite city in the world.

  27. Jody says:

    I like that your project bag matches your Roger sock… :-)

  28. amanda says:

    Oh, I always love travel pics. Here, I especially like the Cornwall pictures, as I can’t recall having seen any before–at least, none with those beaches! Lovely. I don’t know how you got any knitting done.

  29. Marianne says:

    what an amazing location for a knitting retreat…those socks look gorgeous too!

  30. Marianne says:

    oh gosh, I didn’t realise this was Anne Hanson’s blog…*curtseys* I am actually right now knitting a Sprössling cardigan, and I am loving every single stitch!